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DC Elementary School Program Final Week!

By Laura Ma, DC Elementary School Program Intern
Photo Courtesy of AALEAD Staff

To wrap up our blog posts for the final week of our amazing summer program, I have interviewed both members of the staff and students to get their take on their summer with Asian American LEAD (AALEAD). It has certainly been a busy five weeks for staff and students alike, so let’s see what they had to say about our field trips, workshops, and the summer as a whole!

Interview with Brian, Panda Class, Kindergarten

Laura: What was your favorite field trip?
Brian: I think…picking.
Laura: Picking the blackberries? Why did you like picking blackberries?
Brian: I like to eat it.
Laura: What’s your favorite part of the day?
Brian: I don’t know. I like recess.
Laura: Why do you like recess?
Brian: Because I like slides.
Laura: What do you think makes Miss Micah really happy?
Brian: I don’t know! Maybe AALEAD?

Interview with Lisa, Lion Class, 4th Grade

Laura: What was your favorite field trip this summer?
Lisa: Six Flags!
Laura: Why did you like it?
Lisa: I liked the water park.
Laura: What about your favorite workshop?
Lisa: Hakka dancing.
Laura: What is your favorite part of the day?
Lisa: Recess. Because I get to play soccer.
Laura: What do you think makes Miss Micah happiest?
Lisa: When people enjoy AALEAD.

Interview with Melat, Tiger Class, 6th Grade

Laura: What was your favorite field trip this summer?
Melat: Six Flags! It was fun. Swimming, roller coasters, food!
Laura: What was your favorite workshop this summer?
Melat: In the afternoon, we got to learn about other people’s traditions.
Laura: What’s your favorite part of the day?
Melat: Afternoon. Because of the workshops.
Laura: And what do you think makes Miss Micah happiest?
Melat: Listening and paying attention.

Interview with Miss Ari, Tiger Class, Morning Literacy Teacher

Laura: What was your favorite field trip this summer?
Ari: I loved going to  Six Flags because I got to have some individual time with the kids. I had a group of 5 girls, so we got to hang out and get to know each other and goof off. It was just a really exciting, low pressure day where we got to know each other on a more personal level.
Laura: What was your favorite part of the day?
Ari: My favorite part of the day was probably when we would do fun activities, and there would be a little bit of resistance to start at first because they had never done that sort of thing before. We played a few new games, but once they got into it, they were really excited and started encouraging each other. I really love when those moments would happen, and they would always surprise themselves with getting really into things.
Laura: What do you think makes your students the happiest?
Ari: I think feeling like they have agency over what they are doing. And also feeling like they are getting tools that are useful for them. So I think getting to have a balance of getting useful tools that they don’t already have and feeling like they have a choice in what they are doing makes them the happiest.
Laura: And what do you think keeps Miss Micah the happiest?
Ari: (laughs) I think seeing the students really having fun and not even realizing that they are learning. And when things are going smoothly on all ends, and when she just gets to come in and be a part of what’s happening rather than have to mitigate anything. That’s kind of the dream, right? That her team of teachers has all the tools they need to be able to run their programs, and she can just check in to make sure everything is okay.

Interview with Micah, DC Programs Manager

Laura: What was your favorite field trip this summer and why?
Micah: I would say the farm, actually, because the weather was good; it was one of the first field trips that was just relaxing in a way. And to be able to step away from my desk and put down all of the work and just enjoy the kids, the farm, and the blackberries. And it didn’t hurt that blackberries are my favorite fruit.
Laura: What about your favorite workshop series?
Micah: Oh. That one is hard. I really love the middle school transition workshops that the middle and high school students are doing because it’s awesome to see the students – many of whom I knew when they were in elementary school – step into that leadership role and work with the younger students. It’s also been amazing because I’ve seen one student in particular who would refuse to even get up and say her name in front of the class be really excited to do the skits. So to see her just come out of her shell a little bit more and be less shy has been awesome. The other one I really enjoyed has been seeing the Hakka (dancing). The little pieces that I’ve seen of it. It’s just so energizing seeing the kids doing it.
Laura: What is your favorite part of the day?
Micah: Sometimes the quiet at 5PM when all the kids go home, and I can sit at my desk and get work done. But that’s not really the right answer. You know what? My  favorite part of the day is anytime I am able to step away from my desk – not for a behavioral issue – and am able to spend some time in the classroom because that’s a little rare for me.
Laura: What do you think makes the students most happy?
Micah: Recess. Definitely recess. I wish it was something else, but it’s recess.
Laura: And what keeps you the most happy?
Micah: Coffee.

The summer program is now over, and it’s been such a privilege for me to work with people such as Miss Micah and see what the students at AALEAD  get to do. I hope they continue to take advantage of the amazing programs and workshops that AALEAD provides and, of course, enjoy recess.

My Meeting with Mayor Gray!

By Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern
Photo Courtesy of DC Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs (OAPIA)

Last week, Surjeet Ahluwalia, Asian American LEAD’s (AALEAD) Executive Director, and I met with Vincent Gray, Washington DC’s Mayor. I previously asked President Obama his opinion on DC statehood, and the exchange was featured in the press with dozens of articles and broadcasts. Our meeting came about through the increased publicity of DC statehood and with the help of Julie Koo, Executive Director of the DC Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs (OAPIA). I was extremely nervous when I arrived at the Wilson Building. I felt that it was going to be a great meeting and with a deep confident breath, I entered the Mayor’s office. I was greeted by Julie and the Mayor’s personal staff. After a brief wait, I finally met with the Mayor. We sat down in Mayor Gray’s office and began the meeting talking about my interests in DC politics and current events involving the city. After voicing my opinions on DC statehood, we chatted about our personal connections to the city and how we both shared similar visions for the city. It was a great honor to be able to speak to the Mayor about issues that concern me. I would like to say thank you to the Mayor for allowing me the time to speak with him, Julie Koo for helping to set up the meeting, and Surjeet and AALEAD for helping me build my confidence to engage in a dialogue with the President and Mayor and speak freely about my personal opinions.

AALEAD MAC Visits the Capitol!

By Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern
Photos Courtesy of Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff

Last week, the Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) Mentoring Advisory Council (MAC) had a wonderful opportunity to visit the United States Capitol. It was a sweltering day (the hottest day of the week!), but we decided to brave the weather and followed through with our plans. The students met at Thomson Elementary and made our way to the Capitol. Along the way, we passed important federal buildings such as the United States Department of Justice.

We finally arrived at the Capitol Visitor’s Center and met up with the DC youth from Columbia Heights as well as our volunteer and tour guide, David. David works on the Hill as a Legislative Correspondent and was kind enough to give us a tour of the Capitol. After brief introductions between David and the youth, we made our way to see the Crypt. Everyone was fascinated with George Washington’s tomb and the statues of famous historical figures from the thirteen original colonies.

We then ventured over to the Capitol Rotunda and were in absolute awe as we learned about the history of the United States through the eyes of various artists and sculptors. Other areas we had the opportunity to check out were the Old Senate Chamber, Old House of Representatives, and the Old Supreme Court. Visiting these rooms was especially great because we got to learn interesting facts, such as understanding more about what “passing the bar” means. We even got to see paw prints from the infamous “ghost cat” and found the secret spot where people can hear conversations from 30 feet away!

After the tour was over, we made our way to the Hart Senate Building by train. This was a really cool experience since none of us knew that these underground trains even existed! David invited us into his office and told us more about his career path and how he became interested in working for Congress. All of the students had insightful thoughts to share with David as they voiced their opinions on important issues around the world and why they matter to them.

We are so proud of all of the students that participated and can’t wait to celebrate all of the awesome memories that we have shared over the summer this week. A special thank you to David for helping us organize the tour of the Capitol and for taking the time to meet with us and answer our questions! Until next time, everyone – see you soon!

By Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern
Photos Courtesy of Surjeet Ahluwalia, AALEAD Executive Director

**Check out the video on this White House link at 38:29 to see Bhadon ask his question to the President!

Bhadon is a former student and current Mentoring Program Intern. We are so proud of him and hope you enjoy hearing about his experience at President Obama’s Town Hall on the “My Brother’s Keeper” Initiative!

Yesterday, I had the honor of attending the President’s Town Hall on the “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative. The day started off with warm welcomes and introductions between my fellow AALEADers and me. We made our way towards the Walker-Jones Education Campus, where the event was held. With everyone looking their best, it definitely was a fashionable event. After a brief wait in the security line, we made our way to our seats.

The first part of the event included a panel discussion between a student, a Board of Education member, Randall L. Stephenson (the CEO of AT&T), and James H. Shelton, III (the Deputy Secretary of Education). The panel was very insightful and focused on issues which are currently plaguing students from California to DC. After the endorsement of the initiative from NBA Commissioner, Adam Silver, we took a brief break. After the intermission, Chris Paul, an NBA player for the Los Angeles Clippers, came out to introduce President Obama. The President then talked about his plans for success for men of color and also shared his hopes that this initiative would be adopted across the country.

When the President was done with his speech, he opened up the floor for questions from the audience. I thought about asking him a question, but was very nervous. After a few questions were asked, I worked up enough courage to raise my hand. He turned around, looked me in my eyes, and pointed to me while saying, “The young man in the corner with the glasses.” I was in disbelief and had a million thoughts running through my head. As a proud Washingtonian, I asked him a question about a topic that means a lot to me: statehood for the District of Columbia. He immediately smiled his iconic smile and responded with: “I’m in DC. So I am for it.”

With a smile on my face for the rest of the event, I was greeted by strangers that thanked me for asking my question and for representing DC. It truly was one of my best and favorite moments as an AALEADer, and I am so thankful that I was able to attend this great event.

By Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff
Photos Courtesy of AALEAD Staff

Every Wednesday, the middle and high school youth in Asian American LEAD’s (AALEAD) Mentoring Advisory Council (MAC) meet with our rising 6th graders to discuss various topics and issues that they may encounter as they transition into middle school. Two weeks ago, AALEADers met for the very first time and participated in fun team-building activities while learning more about leadership. Read more about the first MAC Transition workshop here!

Last week, AALEADers came together to learn more about the various academic resources offered in middle school. After getting together in small groups, they shared what they think it means to be successful in school and in life. Each group was then given a scenario about a student who was dealing with different challenges in school. They all had to make up a skit about what resources the student should use and how the student could actively participate in finding a solution for his/her problems. The creativity was definitely flowing as AALEADers worked together on their scripts and eventually performed their imaginative, yet pragmatic plays! Youth then reconvened as a larger group to discuss strategies for time management and having more independence in middle school. Our younger students really look up to their older peers who have been doing a great job mentoring them and answering all of their questions.

Yesterday, AALEAD youth talked about what diversity means to them. Students shared insightful thoughts and began to open up as they discussed different qualities that make people unique and why it’s important to be accepting of others, regardless of their backgrounds. Youth were then given a scenario about a new student at school who was made fun of because he/she was different, and all of the groups had to come up with skits and solutions. As each group performed their plays, they all touched on different resources that were discussed last week. When it came time for the group discussion, all of the younger students understood why diversity is important in our world today and knew exactly who they should go to for help. The older AALEAD youth were especially proud of the younger students as they have already learned so much since the first session!

The AALEAD MAC Transition workshops have played a significant role in encouraging our youth to step up to the plate and become leaders not only within AALEAD, but their own lives as well. The workshops have served as a safe space for youth to express their opinions and learn from their peers in a meaningful way. We look forward to spending more time with the MAC students over the rest of the summer and can’t wait to see them grow even more!

Leadership: A Step-by-Step Process

By Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern
Photos Courtesy of Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff

Last Wednesday,  the Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) Mentoring Advisory Council’s (MAC) Transition workshops took place for the very first time! The AALEAD MAC Transition workshops will be happening every Wednesday and are intended for students that are graduating from elementary school to middle school and middle school to high school. Since transitions from and into different school settings can take time for adjustment, these workshops will help support AALEAD youth in becoming more acquainted with the resources available at their schools and provide tips on how to deal with various issues. Some of the topics the AALEAD MAC Transition workshops will be focusing on include leadership, bullying, peer pressure,  time management, and independence. By participating in these workshops, AALEAD’s rising 6th and 9th graders will not only have a head start on their future academic pursuits, but they will also have the opportunity to  share insights and develop leadership skills as they help mentor their peers.

The afternoon kicked off with our middle and high school youth. After a round of introductions, we played games such as Human Knot and also participated in a relay race that was centered on team building, communication, and leadership. After everyone had the chance to get to know each other, we had a discussion on the values of leadership and teamwork. Our AALEAD youth had wonderful thoughts to share as they talked about who their role models are and what qualities they think leaders have.

Next came the workshop with the transitioning elementary school students. After youth were introduced to each other, groups were split up into teams where the middle and high school youth were all paired with some elementary school students. The first activity everyone participated in was the Desert Island where groups all named and created their own desert island. Each team also had to think of three items they would bring on the island. AALEAD youth had so many creative and interesting answers! From beds to survival guides, the students thought of it all and were super excited to share their thoughts.

During the last activity of the day, students stood in a leadership line, and they talked about different aspects of leadership and gauged what levels of leadership they were comfortable with. Similarly to the middle and high school students, elementary school youth also participated in an insightful conversation on the qualities of a good leader with their teams and then with the larger group. As students began to understand more about leadership and the topics that the the AALEAD MAC Transition workshops will cover, they all became eager and ready to learn more.

We are so excited for the rest of the summer and look forward to our next workshop!

By Bhadon Shalakin & Tina Ngo, Mentoring Program Intern & Staff
Photos Courtesy of AALEAD Interns & Staff

This past Saturday, the Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) Mentoring Program held our 2nd Annual Mentoring Program Scavenger Hunt. Mentors and mentees were first invited to a potluck where there was a variety of food ranging from Subway sandwiches to pasta salads and sweet and colorful cupcakes. Unfortunately, there was a 50/50 chance that we would have to cancel the event due to inclement weather. Luckily for us, there was no rain, and the scavenger hunt was on! After all of the mentoring pairs had the chance to chow down and meet with other pairs in the program, it was time for the main event. The pairs were all split into teams of four, and off they were! The scavenger hunt had officially begun.

All of the groups were tasked with figuring out the answers to nine different clues within one hour. They would then have to take pictures or videos near the locations involving those clues to explain or demonstrate different aspects of AALEAD’s three outcomes: leadership, identity, and educational empowerment. Since the teams had the option of choosing which clues to start with first, some groups began their search around Meridian Hill Park while others immediately ran to the U Street Corridor.

At the end of the hour, all of the teams rushed back to the AALEAD DC office to see which group would reign supreme. All of the pairs relaxed and mingled as team by team went inside the conference room to discuss their findings with the judges, Bhadon and Tina. After a suspenseful 15 minutes, it was finally time to announce the victors! As the champions stepped up to claim their prizes, everyone found out that they were all winners. No one left empty-handed as the scavenger hunt was a victory for everyone; we all made new friendships and bonded over our shared commonalities and interests.

Events like the scavenger hunt are a wonderful opportunity to not only make new friends, but also learn a lot about ourselves and our community along the way. Sprinkled with lots of fun, laughter, and cheer, the 2nd Annual Mentoring Program Scavenger Hunt was truly a success! Many thanks to all of the mentors and mentees who participated as well as Heein, our Development and Communications Intern, who helped us document the entire event. We hope you all had a blast and can’t wait to see what else this summer has in store for us! See you soon!

By Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern
Photo Courtesy of Bhadon Shalakin, Mentoring Program Intern

Hi, my name is Bhadon Shalakin, and I am the Mentoring Program Intern this summer. I am currently heading into my freshman year of college at the University of Kentucky. I have been a part of AALEAD for 5 years as a student, but this is my first summer being an intern. I am looking forward to helping Tina teach students about leadership and community involvement as well as give advice on their transitions into middle or high school. While I have already taught some of these students before, I will also be meeting some of them for the first time, and I am excited to work with all of them this summer!

Interesting facts about myself: I was originally born in Dhaka, Bangladesh and moved to Washington, DC when I was only 1.5 years old. I enjoyed watching almost every sport and also play soccer and football frequently. Some of my other hobbies are to cook and read.

I know this summer will be a great opportunity to grow and develop as an advocate for the community. I especially look forward to gaining more hands-on experience while teaching a diverse group of students and think this is an awesome way to spend my last summer with AALEAD.

**Learn more about our other Summer 2014 Interns here: AlexDavidHeein, and Laura!**

By Alex Neeley, DC Elementary School Program Intern
Photo Courtesy of Alex Neeley, DC Elementary School Program Intern

Hello! My name is Alex Neeley, and I will be interning with the DC Elementary School Program this summer. I am currently going into my junior year at the University of Washington in Seattle where I am pursuing a degree in International Studies. I am also a 2012 graduate of Woodrow Wilson Senior High School in Washington, DC.

In the past, I have worked with elementary school children at the Smithsonian Summer Camp. Additionally, I have worked with high school students through the University of Washington Dream Project, a program that helps low-­income high school juniors and seniors from Seattle apply for college and post-secondary school careers. Through AALEAD, I am looking to continue my work with children, while providing support and guidance for my fellow DC Public School (DCPS) students. I am excited for this summer and look forward to working with everyone at AALEAD!

**Learn more about our other Summer 2014 Interns here: Bhadon, David, Heein, and Laura!**

By Laura Ma, DC Elementary School Program Intern
Photo Courtesy of Laura Ma, DC Elementary School Program Intern

Hello! My name is Laura Ma, and I am very excited to be in Washington DC this summer working as one of AALEAD’s DC Elementary School Program Interns. I am originally from Elkton, MD and am a rising senior at the University of Delaware, where I am pursuing a dual degree in East Asian Studies and Interpersonal Communications with a minor in Mandarin Chinese. My interest in AALEAD comes from my interest in Asian culture, intercultural communications, and teaching. This past spring semester, I lived and studied Chinese in Shanghai while additionally teaching fourth grade English at a migrant school. I look forward to using the skills from that experience here in DC through community and youth development at Thomson Elementary School.

Here are other fun facts about myself: I am second generation Honduran and Chinese and have a love for food from all cultures. Although I am not great at cooking, I love eating and socializing. My favorite television shows include, but are definitely not limited to: Modern Family, Game of Thrones, and House of Cards. During my free time, I like to play tennis and volleyball. Traveling is another hobby of mine which I hope to continue after graduation as I am currently applying for a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship in Taiwan.

I am very excited to begin this internship because I know I will be learning and cultivating my own skills while helping students and contributing to AALEAD.

**Learn more about our other Summer 2014 Interns here: AlexBhadonDavid, and Heein!**