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By Ying C., AALEAD DC Student
Photos courtesy of Shobana Modur, DC Middle and High School Program Coordinator

AALEADers LOVE community service! From wrapping presents for our holiday parties to serving food for the less fortunate, our youth love giving back to their community.  When AALEADers had the day off from school, they jumped at the chance to volunteer at DC Central Kitchen.  Check out a blog post by one of our youth, Ying, below!

On February 23rd, a couple of AALEADers and I volunteered at the DC Central Kitchen.  Central Kitchen is a non-profit organization which helps reduce hunger for those less fortunate while also serving them very healthy and nutritional meals. They distribute meals every day to homeless shelters and transitional homes.

At Central Kitchen, there were many tasks, which kept us very busy.  We diced peppers, chopped up carrots, washed celery, and sorted the poor strawberries from the ripe ones. This experience was very important because we assisted in preparing meals that would be given out to people who are less fortunate. It was very pleasing to know that we participated in reducing hunger for these people who aren’t as lucky as we are.

Overall, Central Kitchen provided me with a very fun and exciting learning experience that I will definitely need in the future. I learned culinary skills which would provide many benefits for me in life, as well as the struggles that the homeless and at-risk populations face.  Everyone who works there is passionate about their work, hence providing a fun and engaging atmosphere.  I had a lot of fun volunteering and definitely plan to volunteer with DC Central Kitchen in the near future.

Special thanks to our friends at DC Central Kitchen!  We look forward to coming back and volunteering with you again!

By Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff
Photos Courtesy of Angela B., CSF-DC

Every January, Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) celebrates National Mentoring Month in honor of our committed mentors and the positive impact that they have on our youth. Last week, we held our second annual Mentor Appreciation Month Celebration at the Verizon Center Dewar’s 12 Coaches Club with five partner organizations: Capital Partners for Education (CPE), the DC College Success Foundation (CSF-DC), For Love of Children (FLOC-DC), the Mentor Foundation USA, and Mentors, Inc.

This was a great opportunity to collaborate with other community-based organizations doing wonderful work in the greater DC Metro area. In addition to celebrating all of our amazing mentors, we were also honored to announce AALEAD’s Mentoring Hero of the Year, Jessica L. We are so proud of all of our AALEAD mentors and the accomplishments that they have made with our youth over the past year!

As we wrap up National Mentoring Month, we wanted to give a shout out to all of our current and former mentors who have made and continue to make a difference in the lives of our young people and community. The work that we do is not possible without you, and we truly appreciate all of your efforts in ensuring that our youth have opportunities to succeed. Happy National Mentoring Month, and we can’t wait to celebrate with all of you again next year!

Interested in reading more? Check out our mentors’ stories here: Elizabeth, Su, and Tippa!

Mentoring Matters: Su’s Story

By Su L., Current AALEAD Mentor
Photos Courtesy of Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff

Thank you all for celebrating National Mentoring Month with us! A huge shout out to Su and all of our former and current mentors and volunteers who have invested their time and energy into our youth. The impact that you have made on our students is immeasurable, and we can’t wait to celebrate again with you next year! Thank you so much for all that you do. We hope you enjoyed this series, and Happy National Mentoring Month! -Tina Ngo, Mentoring & Volunteer Program Coordinator

In 2013, I found myself in a great position to be a volunteer: I had a strong commitment to give back to a community in need and the time to do so.  While I always had the former, the latter always seemed to be out of reach for one reason or another.  Through the company I worked for then, Deloitte, I found Asian American LEAD (AALEAD).  Their mission resonated with me, and I signed up to be a mentor.  I knew I wanted to be a mentor because I have seen the value of mentoring first hand—a cousin-turned mentor who guided me through my first year of college and a supervisor-turned mentor that exemplified what a leader should be.

Li is my mentee.  She is an intelligent, sweet, fun, and driven 17-year-old.  Since Li is an excellent student, our goals have geared towards doing community service together, trying new things (we are currently trying to tackle a list of ethnic foods we haven’t tried before), and working towards Li’s next exciting milestone: college.  We’ve also spent many times talking over frozen yogurt or hot chocolate—some of my favorite moments with her because we can simply catch up, listen to each other’s stories, and relax.  It’s also these moments where I feel humbled to have a mentee— especially that she can come to me and share what’s on her mind.

Before I met Li, I certainly had my doubts in my ability to be a good mentor.  I like to think that our time together has proven me wrong—we’ve managed to learn together what works for us.  Collectively, Li and the AALEAD Mentoring Program have given me the opportunity to work with great people, have some fun (of course!), make new connections, and strengthen my confidence as an effective helper.  I’ve also watched Li grow personally and couldn’t be more proud of the young adult she is becoming.  It has been a wonderful experience thus far, and I look forward to all that’s in store for us in the upcoming year.

Check out Elizabeth’s story here and Tippa’s story here!

Mentoring Matters: Elizabeth’s Story

By Elizabeth S., Current AALEAD Mentor
Photos Courtesy of Elizabeth S., Current AALEAD Mentor & Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff

As we near the end of National Mentoring Month, check out Elizabeth’s great story and inspiring words below. Thank you to Elizabeth and all of our wonderful mentors – we are so grateful for you and honored to have you in our Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) family and community! Happy National Mentoring Month! -Tina Ngo, Mentoring & Volunteer Program Coordinator

I first heard about AALEAD around the end of 2010 from a roommate of mine who had participated in the program as a mentor a couple years before.  As a second-generation Asian American (child of immigrants), I felt that this program was for me because second-generation Asian Americans are exactly who AALEAD serves.

Growing up, I felt that my parents had a hard time empathizing with the fact that I had one foot in their culture and the other foot in another culture.  Daily, I felt torn between the norms and expectations of my household and of the world outside and never felt like I could fully relate to any of my friends or family.  As a result, it took me a while to understand my identity and be comfortable with who I was.  I joined AALEAD hopeful that maybe I could be someone a second-generation child could relate to.  After seeing the Mentoring Program at work, I couldn’t be more impressed with the AALEAD Mentoring Program and how AALEAD staff foster the confidence and sense of identity of each AALEADer.

I joined AALEAD in March 2011 and expected to get paired up with a pre-teen.  I showed up to meet Tender, my mentee, at her house, thought she looked very small for her age, and finally asked how old she was. She was eight! Today, that little girl is now 12. Wow, how time flies! Also, lo and behold, Tender is the little sister of my now former roommate’s former mentee.  Small world!

Being Tender’s mentor has taught me so much, and has given me a different perspective about my own life and childhood.  Mentoring Tender has taught me more about patience, communication, relationship building, and having an open mind than any other experience I’ve had.  Seeing life through her eyes helps me understand what is going on with her and how I can help foster her growth.  We have been paired up through major transitions of Tender’s childhood – through her elementary years, her pre-teen years, and we are now about to enter her teen years – so truthfully, mentoring has not been the easiest ride as her needs were always changing.

Through the years, I have had to learn how to balance the “big sister” role, which was probably because she was so young when we began, and “trustworthy friend,” now that she is developing and figuring out her own identity.  Watching Tender grow from a shy and timid 8-year-old into the witty, confident, and intelligent person she has become has been and is the most rewarding aspect of being her mentor.  I hope that I have had even a fraction of the positive impact on Tender that she has had on me.  I am excited for Tender’s future and hope for her to know the world of possibilities she has in front of her.  As we enter another phase of Tender’s life, I look forward to sharing more memories with her, being there for her, and us growing together.

Check out Su’s story here and Tippa’s story here!

Mentoring Matters: Tippa’s Story

By Tippa C., Current AALEAD Mentor
Photos Courtesy of Tippa C., Current AALEAD Mentor

Every January, the Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) Mentoring Program celebrates National Mentoring Month. National Mentoring Month is not only a time for us to honor all of our mentors and how incredible they are, but also a time for them to reflect on their experiences and how much they and their mentees have grown over the past year. Though it is only National Mentoring Month once a year, we are thankful for our mentors year-round and could not do the work that we do without their support and commitment. As the end of the month draws near, we wanted to highlight a few of their stories and the impact that they have made on our youth.  Check out Tippa’s story below! Thank you to Tippa and all of our amazing mentors – you continue to inspire us every single day. We hope you enjoy, and Happy National Mentoring Month! -Tina Ngo, Mentoring & Volunteer Program Coordinator

I began mentoring with AALEAD in 2011, and the experience has been rewarding from the moment my mentee, Shirley, and I first met!  Initially, I was looking to be a tutor for students that needed some help in school, but I stumbled upon AALEAD’s Mentoring Program which sounded even better and has exceeded my expectations of what mentoring programs can do (even I get excited about tours at the Capitol and Kennedy Center concerts!).  In all seriousness, I am amazed at the AALEAD staff and how they run the program while still making it fun and flexible for mentors, mentees, and their families.  What really appealed to me were the efforts to include families (especially parents) into the program so that collectively we can all be advocates for youth development.

I feel as if I’ve known Shirley for such a long time. Shirley is soft-spoken, silly, passionate, and caring. We’ve shared stories of each other’s families, our goals that we aspire to achieve, milestones that make us nearly sisters, and silly moments of touring Marco, the piñata (see photo below), around DC before he was sacrificed to a group of young girls for candy.

Whether it’s today or 10 years from now, I hope that Shirley is able to look back and know that she has a community behind her and someone that she can call to chat or hang out with.  I hope that I have given her encouragement to pursue her dreams, the insight to value family and relationships, but above all, the belief that she should feel proud of who she is and who she will become.

Through AALEAD, I have met some incredible people and have learned so much about myself as well.  It’s great to be a part of an organization that fosters culture and growth, and I couldn’t have found a better organization than AALEAD to share these moments with.

Check out Elizabeth’s story here and Su’s story here!

By Shobana Modur, DC Middle and High School Program Coordinator

Photos courtesy of AALEAD staff

Last Wednesday evening, a couple of DC AALEAD students and staff were invited to attend a special screening of the upcoming television series, “Fresh off the Boat” at the Newseum.  It is the first Asian-American sitcom in 20 years! Based off Eddie Huang’s memoir of the same title, “Fresh off the Boat” tells the story of a Taiwanese family moving from their home in Washington, D.C. to Orlando, FL and their struggles of assimilating.

This hilarious comedy hits issues that AALEADers often explore, such as embracing their identity and finding a balance between American and our family’s culture.  After the preview, a few members of the cast and Eddie Huang took the stage to discuss the origins of the show, the challenges faced by AAPI actors, and how this story will hopefully break Asian-American stereotypes.  Shortly afterwards, it was time for the reception where our starstruck AALEADers took pictures with Eddie Huang.  It was a very fun night!

Make sure to watch Fresh off the Boat airing Tuesday, February 10th at 8 pm on ABC!

Reflections On My AALEAD Internship

By Dong Zhou, DC Elementary School Program Intern
Photos Courtesy of April Kim, DC Elementary School Program Teacher

The time passed by so fast. I can’t believe my fall internship is ending! This was my first internship ever, and I received many unique experiences from it.

First of all, I am touched by Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) staff members. They have fully dedicated themselves to the community that we serve, and they treat each other like family. Working with these wonderful people gave me much more knowledge than I could have ever received in class. I am truly thankful for the opportunity to intern at AALEAD.

Everyone at AALEAD is trying to work as hard as possible and solve problems as fast as possible. Micah, my supervisor, is always busy, and I barely saw her take some time to rest. She is occupied all the time, whether working or in a meeting. Also, how knowledgeable she is about so many fields shocked me! She knows Chinese; she can use multiple databases; and she is an expert at Excel. During programs, she has an amazing way of connecting with and teaching students; our youth respect her very much.

Interning at AALEAD also gave me the opportunity to learn more about both the American education system and American society. For the education part, my experience at Thomson Elementary School taught me more about how American elementary schools work and how youth development organizations like AALEAD collaborate with them. I learned that the United States has a society that is supported by multiple entities, such as government, corporations, non profit organizations, etc., and each of these entities is important and contributes to society in different ways.

I had a great experience interning at AALEAD and am very thankful for the opportunity to intern here. I will be sad to go but hope to visit soon. Thank you to AALEAD staff and all of the people that supported me during my time at AALEAD!

An Accomplished Morning!

By Yuanlong, AALEAD DC Student
Photos Courtesy of Alex Jue, AALEAD Mentor & Tina Ngo, AALEAD Staff

Asian American LEAD (AALEAD) focuses on three different outcomes: Educational Empowerment, Identity Development, and Leadership. Every year, our youth work towards their leadership goals by participating in various community service activities across the greater DC Metro area. From creating cards for our veterans in the armed forces to volunteering at local homeless shelters, volunteering gives our youth the opportunity to learn about the importance of giving back and how they can make their communities a better place. This past weekend, four of our youth in the Mentoring Program volunteered with their mentors at SOME (So Others Might Eat) and the Central Union Mission. They had a great time volunteering together and wanted to share their experiences with the larger community. Check out a blog post by one of our students, Yuanlong, below! -Tina Ngo, Mentoring & Volunteer Program Coordinator

On Saturday, November 15, AALEAD students and their mentors came out to SOME to help out the homeless community. SOME, or So Others Might Eat, is a non-profit organization that helps give homeless people food to eat and a place to stay. We volunteered at SOME as a way to give back to the community and gain some experiences working in the kitchen (now I know how my parents felt washing dishes for me for half my life, and I’m grateful for them!).

During our stay at SOME, we had several different jobs. This included washing dishes and cups, clearing tables, and serving water and coffee. We all worked hard, and no matter which job we were assigned, we all still had fun doing it. This experience was a great way for some of the AALEAD family to create closer relationships with each other. Though it was hard waking up early in the morning to do some community service, we had an accomplished morning and all agreed that we would get together to do another community service event soon!

Special thanks to our friends at SOME (So Others Might Eat) and the Central Union Mission for giving our youth the opportunity to volunteer with them and learn more about the populations that they serve. We look forward to coming back and working with you again soon!

Thomson Tales: Thanking our Veterans

By Charles Kuo, DC Elementary School Program Site Coordinator & Parent Outreach Coordinator
Photos Courtesy of AALEAD Staff

AALEAD introduces “Thomson Tales”! In this blog series, you will be enlightened with the latest happenings at our DC Elementary School Program at Thomson Elementary School. Now take a deep breath… and prepare to be amazed!

Today, November 11, we celebrate and thank our veterans for their willingness to serve and sacrifice for our country. It is a day to honor their selflessness and courage. Last week, our AALEADers took the initiative in thanking our veterans by making personalized cards and posters. As part of their current unit, our Turtles (Grades K-1) class have started a BOB (Building Outside the Box) series. The series encompasses lessons on life skills, community service, and  STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and  Math) skills.

All of the cards started with the same salutation of “Dear Hero”. However, each of the students took time to write their own personal and encouraging messages. It was great to see them seriously thinking of how to express their gratitude in a creative way. More importantly, it was a great moment for the students to think outside of themselves and to practice giving back to their community.  The cards and  a joint group poster were all sent to Operation Gratitude which “annually sends 150,000+ care packages filled with snacks, entertainment, hygiene and hand-made items, plus personal letters of appreciation, to New Recruits, Veterans, First Responders, Wounded Warriors, Care Givers and to individually named U.S. Service Members deployed overseas.” (Resource: http://www.operationgratitude.com/about-us/about-operation-gratitude/).

Many of students said they felt “good” and “happy” after their acts of kindness and were looking forward to their next project! We are excited to provide them that future opportunity. Until then, we’ll definitely keep you updated with our other happenings at our DC Elementary School Program at Thomson Elementary School!

Thank you for reading this edition of “Thomson Tales”. Remember to check back on our blog weekly for program and staff updates. Follow us: Twitter and Instagram (@aalead). Like us on Facebook (Asian American LEAD)!

Thomson Tales: An Art Exhibition!

By  Charles Kuo, DC Elementary School Program Site Coordinator & Parent Outreach Coordinator
Photos Courtesy of Micah Shearer, AALEAD Staff

AALEAD introduces “Thomson Tales”! In this blog series, you will be enlightened with the latest happenings at our DC Elementary School Program at Thomson Elementary School. Now take a deep breath… and prepare to be amazed!

AALEADers work on their mixed media art pieces

It has been more than a month since our DC Elementary School Program has started, and I must admit that every day brings new surprises. One of those surprises occurred during a brainstorming session in our 4th and 5th grade class in the beginning of the year.  As our students provided suggestions for curriculum, events, and activities, we found that they were particularly excited about one thing: ART!

"Stitch" by Johnny, Jonathan, and Jianheng

I was particularly surprised because our youth not only wanted to learn and do art, they also wanted to showcase and teach it, too! This past Friday, our 4th and 5th grade class hosted AALEAD’s first ever Thomson Art Exhibition! During the Art Exhibition, our 4th and 5th graders showcased original art, provided informative art tours, and facilitated workshops. The event was program-wide and held in Thomson’s cafeteria. Over the past few weeks, our students worked on three specific techniques of art:

Mixed Media (a collaboration of different art materials, giving students artistic license to express themselves)
Color Resistant (typically with water colors and crayons, the crayon will “resist” and/or repel the water color away from it, highlighting a message and/or image)
Abstract (the use of masking tape and paint to make complex patterns)

Simon leads one of his many tour groups

Despite initially being novices to these different techniques, our youth instantly fell in love with the art forms and started implementing their own perspectives and interpretations. For example, in the abstract piece entitled “Bella,” 4th grader Siyan described how she and her classmates put the piece together:

First, we got green, blue, and purple. Imara mixed them. I (Siyan) was watching the Twilight saga, and Bella was mysterious. Indigo is mysterious too, so I thought they matched. Next, Rahel came up with this wonderful idea for this picture.

"Bella" by Siyan, Rahel, and Imara

The exhibition was set up to be interactive, and students from our respective pre-K to 3rd grade classes were so excited to make art projects of their own.  It was a treat to witness the collective excitement that took place in the venue. Everyone was engaged and ready to learn. Truthfully, what will resonate the most with me about this experience was the process. It was a joy to see our youth prepare and contribute to this event. Despite their initial doubts, they were 100% accountable and willing to serve every step of the way.

To many, art is considered to be one of our few universal languages or a means of communication that is said to be understood by all living things and beings. At this Art Exhibition, our youth exemplified that belief. Our youth took an interest that was personal and chose to share it. They empowered others to make art their own by simply taking an opportunity to lead.

A special thanks to Mr. Justin, our 4th and 5th grade teacher, for leading this event and mentoring our youth.